Category Archives: Fishing

The 4 Best Saltwater Fishing Lures for Fishing Panama’s Tuna Coast

Cedar Plug

Made from lead and cedar wood, many professional anglers who the fish tuna coast swear by this simple lure. First, the line is run down the center and then attached to the hook, which extends up into the lure. Although it is a simple design, this is one of the most successful lures around. Many anglers like to attach multiple cedar plugs in a daisy chain. As the lure bobs up and down in an irresistible jiggling motion, the tuna can’t help but bite. Cedar plugs are offered in a rainbow of color designs, but most people wanting to fish the tuna coast prefer the simple, unpainted variety.

Salas Jig

On the West Coast, anglers refer to metal jigs as “slinging iron”, using the lures to catch everything from barracuda, albacore, sea bass, and marlin to tuna. The first iron jig ever invented was called the Salas jig. First invented in the 1950s by the renowned Salas fishing family, today’s Salas Jigs are no longer made out of iron. Modern Salas Jigs are constructed from different metals, each one custom-designed for density and weight. At the bantam level of the scale is the Light 7X, which swims enticingly on the surface of the water. Heavier Salas Jigs include the 6X and 7X, which are more suitable for deep sea fishing in Panama Tuna Coast. Coming in a riot of colors and designs, including the famous Senorita and Nacho models, the Salas Jig is perfect for catching fish off the Tuna coast of Panama.

Rapala Magnum

In the early 1930s, a savvy Finnish angler named Lauri Rapala began studying how schools of fish move through the water, and discovered that game fish were more attracted to bait fish that swam in a slightly irregular motion. After taking this knowledge home and designing hundreds of lures, he perfected the Rapala Magnum. Shaped like a minnow, the Rapala Magnum is now available in both freshwater and saltwater versions. While competitors now offer plastic versions, experienced anglers who love to fish Panama prefer only Rapala Magnums made from wood.

Diamond Jig

In 1929, an avid fisherman named John Schumke decided to fashion a four-sided metal lure. Banking on his experience working for the Bridgeport Silvercare Company, this dazzling lure was originally known as the Bridgeport Diamond Jig. By 1955, the popularity of this lure grew so much that Schumke sold the rights to the Bead Tackle Company. Today, all Diamond Jigs are still manufactured in New England, and are some of the highest quality lures available on the market. Anyone interested in fishing the Tuna Coast should expect great success when employing the Diamond Jig, as these fish find the sparkling lure enticing.

What You Need To Know Before You Fish in Bay Area Houston

If you’re a fan of going on fishing trips, then you’re the kind of person that will do all you can to make sure that the trips you take are noteworthy. You leave no stone unturned, which means that you’ve no doubt decided to take a trip to fish in Bay Area Houston. In fact, you’re banking on your trip to southeastern Texas to be one you’ll remember for a long time.

But what exactly is so special about taking a trip out to Bay Area Houston? Well, this is what the collective area between Houston and Galveston is known as. Because of its proximity to bodies of water, with the most notable being the Gulf of Mexico, water-based commerce and shipping are king.

Whether you are an experienced angler or a relative newbie to fishing, you still understand that every new place to cast your line will present its own unique set of challenges. If you’ve never been to Bay Area Houston, what you’ll be encountering may get you to have to re-think your approach down to the type of bait you use and how you’ll handle wind (April winds are notorious for making even experienced fishermen get frustrated).

Here a few things you need to know if you plan on making Bay Area Houston your next fishing destination:

Chartered Fishing Trips – It is amazing how many chartered fishing trips you can go on. Not only are the trips well-organized, but the people taking you out on these trips have been fishing the area for decades, which means you’ve got some good fishing to look forward to.

Many Choices of Fish – You might find it nice to cast a line at a local watering hole for one type of fish. However, a trip to Bay Area Houston will yield chances to catch a lot of different types of fish including but not limited to: speckled trout, black drum, flounder, and red fish.

An Enviable Coastline – There aren’t a lot of places that have thirty-five miles of coastline at their disposal, but Bay Area Houston isn’t just any place. You also have the popular Clear Lake, as well as Trinity Bay, Galveston Bay, East Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico.

A Different Kind of Water – Because of the geographical make-up of Bay Area Houston, many of the bodies of water you’ll be working with have what is known as brackish water. Brackish water is, in essence, a combination of fresh water and salt water. This presents its own challenges to anglers, but it can also provide some very nice rewards.

Choosing to fish in Bay Area Houston means you’ve decided that you want what some would argue is the best fishing in the state of Texas. The great thing is that no matter the level of fisherman you are, you are sure to find the right place to cast your line.

Top 5 Sport Fishing Destinations You Need to Add to Your Bucket List

5. Cabo San Lucas, Mexico:

Cabo San Lucas is known as a tourist hub that offers myriads of things to see and do. Because the place is situated right on the tip of the southern Mexican Peninsula, it offers an incredible deep sea fishing opportunity for visitors of all ages. Fishing enthusiasts come every year to the city to catch species, including wahoo, tuna and even billfish. Also, the town’s vibrant setting, ample shopping opportunities and vacation villas offer each visitor a fun holidaying experience.

4. Florida Keys:

Nestled adjacent to the 125-mile-long arc of islands is the beautiful Florida Keys fishing grounds. This destination offers a unique environment where visitors can enjoy deep sea fishing. Also, this destination is home to five most sought-after fish species: permit, redfish, bonefish, tarpon and snook. Countless charter boats and fishing charters offer guided trips every day. Those looking for some different experiences can head to the arc off the Keys where species like blue and white marlin, tuna, wahoo and swordfish are found in abundance.

3. Bimini, Bahamas:

This gorgeous island in the Bahamas is often termed as the sports fishing capital of the world. The warm waters of the small island offer an optimal setting for the fish habitat. Here, fishermen can expect to find yellowtail, big black grouper and mutton snapper. This ideal destination offers year-round fishing opportunities for all. Resorts in Bimini offer deep-sea excursions for visitors and fishermen alike.

2. Phuket, Thailand:

Old temples, floating markets and pulsating nightlife are not the only attractions for which Phuket is known. In fact, this destination has become a premier deep-sea fishing location in this day and age. The beautiful warm waters in Phuket offer a favorable habitat for many species. The clear and turquoise waters of the Andaman Sea create a perfect atmosphere in Phuket for fishing. Visitors can expect to find lots of billfish, queenfish, game fish and mahi here. Fishing enthusiasts should follow the strict fishing rules while taking a fishing excursion in Phuket. Because of the fierce rules, Phuket is still one of those few pristine regions that remain as an ideal deep-sea fishing destination.

1. Panama, Central America:

Sport fishing in Panama is gaining popularity. This destination offers a number of fishing spots where guests can enjoy the thrill of catching grouper, snapper, amberjack and rooster fish. As one of the most consistently productive fisheries in the world, Panama has always been a number one fishing destination. Sports fishing lodges like the El Rio Negro offer all inclusive fishing charters and fishing tours for avid fishermen and beginners alike.

Tips for Ice Fishing

You always want to make sure you have all the right equipment before hitting the lake. Here are a couple of the more important equipment you need for ice fishing, always have proper winter clothing, back-up winter clothing in case you fall in the water, fully charged cell phone, so if anything happens you have a way to contact someone, if you are out fishing alone. You also need a bucket, ice scoop, auger, bait, tip-ups or fishing pole and you tackle. You want to make sure you always go through your check list every time you hit the lake.

Once you are out on the ice, finding the right depth matters. Most fish will generally stay in a specific depth during the winter, which can make it easier to find them. If it is a common lake you have fished regularly during the summer months you will know all the premium spots and depths of the lake. If you aren’t familiar with the lake you can hop online and look for a map of the lake and it will show you all the different depths of the lake and you can check out the depths for the species you are looking to fish for.

Now that you have found a spot to fish, you can start drilling holes in the ice for your tip-ups, if you have some and a couple of holes to fish from while waiting on your tip-ups to go off. Remember to spread out the placement of your holes. If you put them close to each other you have the worries of them getting tangled when there is a fish on and some people say having them close together loses you chance of catching a fish as there are too much bait in one area.

You are ready to start fishing, some people say you ice fish like you are summer fishing, which isn’t true. You want to make sure you are going slow and steady as fish don’t expend as much energy during the winter months.If you are looking to give your fishing a jump start, you can always chum the hole before you start fishing. Sometimes chumming your hole can actually bring more fish to your area. You can use minnows or wax worms and let the fish go to town. Always have different types of bait with you, as you never know what the fish are looking to eat on that day. If you move your bait or jig too fast, a fish might let it go to save some energy. If you are going to be fishing for bluegills or perch, you want to fish the bottom as they love to feed off the bottom during the winter months.

Now that you have a few tips for a successful ice fishing trip. Get off the computer and put those tips to the test. Always remember to be safe and know the thickness of the ice before walking or driving out on the ice. You don’t want to start your ice fishing trip having to turn around right away from falling in.

Enjoy Your Alaska Fishing Experience

Alaska’s fishing holidays are among the hottest with vacationers. With folks wanting to flee their day by day life, these luxurious fishing holidays are a good way to can get nearer to nature.

Salmon is frequent alongside the Alaskan coast. So is massive halibut. Guest may also catch salmon weighing as much as 50 pounds and king salmon over 50 pounds are under no circumstances unusual. Grayling and northern pike are very simple to catch in lots of inland streams. And you’ll fish alongside a few of the most unimaginable surroundings on the continent.

To make certain, it’s far from perfect. The productivity of most Alaska streams just isn’t high as compared with those in hotter climes. Which means that some heavily fished streams don’t rapidly produce many massive fish, notably in the Interior. Massive salmon runs compensate in lots of streams, nevertheless.

The acute tides and ocean currents surrounding Alaska creates the ideally suited habitats for baitfish, which in turn entice returning salmon and bottom fish in astounding numbers. Alaska promotes fishing as its predominant sporting occasion. Giant numbers of vacationers visit the place to participate in this adventurous sport.

South-central Alaska is home to probably the most well-known fishing areas within the state. Coastal waters and watersheds embody the place with diversified land and seascapes. Along with salmon and halibut, different fish like trout, pike, grayling, Dolly Varden, burbot, whitefish and different species may be discovered year-round within the many watersheds that form the primary vacationer sights.

Southeast Alaska, typically known as the “panhandle,” is a land of deep fjords, speeding mountain streams and glaciers. A lot of the land is within the Tongass Nationwide Forest. Summers are cool and moist; winters are cooler and snowy, however a lot less chilly than other parts of Alaska not warmed by the ocean. Salmon return in massive numbers to thousands of streams. Halibut move close to the shore waters in the summertime. A number of species of trout can be found. A wide range of bottom fish may be caught. Shrimp and crab may be present in some waters.

Lower Cook Inlet is also a well-liked fishing vacation spot in the summertime months. Clams, halibut and salmon hold the anglers busy all through the day. The Kuskokwim and Yukon rivers drain most of the Interior, Arctic and Western Alaska, which is sparsely coated by timber. Grayling are most widespread within the area, together with trout, pike, burbot, char and shellfish.

Panama Fishing – Coiba Island & Hannibal Banks

Coiba Island

Located off the Pacific Coast of Panama, Coiba Island is part of the province of Veraguas and the district of Montijo. At 503 square kilometers (194 square miles), Coiba Island is the largest island in all of Central America.

Coiba was originally home to the Cacique Indian tribe until Spanish settlement and conquest circa 1560. The island remained largely uninhabited until 1919, when authorities built a penal colony on the island. The colony was known and feared for its brutality and was finally closed in 2004. The entire island was declared a national park in 1992. In 2005, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) declared Coiba Island a world heritage site.

Coiba’s isolation and lack of development has led to the evolution of distinct species of flora and fauna. Subspecies unique to the island include the Coiba Island howler monkey, the Coiba agouti and the Coiba spinetail. It is also a haven for the scarlet macaw, a bird species endangered in the rest of Panama.

Coiba also has a unique ocean topography that has led to population by rare species of fish and underwater mammals. Coiba is linked to the Galápagos Islands by the underwater Coco Ridge mountain chain. This protects the island and the surrounding waters from the effects of El Nino. As a result, the waters host several species yet to be discovered or classified by humankind. To date, scientists have found more than 760 different species of fish, including Snapper, Amberjack, Barracuda and three types of Marlin.

Fishing Coiba Island an angler’s dream. The waters host abundant schools of some of the most exotic game fish in the world. If you decide to fish in Coiba while in Panama, there’s a good chance you will catch something that you have never seen before. Roosterfish, Cubera snapper, Wahoo, Snook and Pacific Tarpon are some of the species that you can catch when you fish Coiba. You also can find plenty of the staples of sport fishing like Black Marlin and Yellowfin Tuna. Fishing Coiba is a Panama experience that you won’t forget.

Hannibal Banks

Hannibal Banks is a sea-mount located approximately 20 miles west of Coiba Island. It was named after the USS Hannibal, a converted steamship purchased by the United States Navy. The ship’s crew discovered the banks in 1914 while doing survey work for the Panama Canal.

The Hannibal Banks rise sharply from the ocean floor from several thousand feet to just over a hundred feet deep. This creates a strong “up-welling” of the ocean currents which results in cooler, deeper and more nutrient-rich water replacing the surface water. The constant replenishment of the water with nutrients attracts smaller baitfish. The baitfish, in turn, attract large numbers of sport trophy fish.

The abundance of these big game fish makes the Hannibal Banks one of the most popular sport fishing destinations in the Western Hemisphere. Commercial fishing is strictly prohibited, and the Panamanian military takes aggressive enforcement against violators. Most of the Panama sport fishing charters cooperate with the government by reporting any illegal activity. As a result, the Hannibal Banks maintains its abundant supply of sport fish despite the fact that fishing in Hannibal Banks has become more popular over the past twenty years.

If you are looking for big game such as Marlin, Sailfish or Yellowfin Tuna, the Hannibal Banks is a mecca for these fish. The months of December through April are when these fish are at their peak, but the Hannibal Banks is sufficiently populated that you can still get a great catch during the off season. “Fishing season” is a relative term here, with abundant supply year round.

Five Accessories to Get You Started With Bowfishing

Year after year the interest in bowfishing grows. I mean, what better way for you to practice your hunting form when you are not able to be out in the woods? The good thing for you, is that if you have a compound, or a recurve bow already, you can add a few parts to your bow and you will be good to go. The manufacturers of the bowfishing accessories have made most of their items compatible with standard pre-fabricated holes on your riser. The following, quick bullet list will cover the items that you would need to hit the ground (or boat) running.

  • A durable and dependable reel
  • A bow–if you don’t have one already
  • An arrow rest
  • Bowfishing points
  • Bowfishing arrows

I have to start with the reel, because you do not want to skimp on one of the most important pieces of your bowfishing gear. The reel can make or break your trip if it fails. This is why I suggest getting something like the AMS Retriever Reel Pro. This is great if you are just starting out because there are no buttons that you would have to push to take the shot. Once you are more experienced, you can get a standard fishing reel to mimic this same effect. Fishing line that is anywhere from 80 pounds to 150 pounds is optimal to have in your reel.

The archery bow should be a no-brainer. If you are interested in shooting in bowfishing tournaments, then it is best option for you is to get a dedicated bowfishing-rig. Most of the options that are on the market are going to have a blue finish on them. There are offerings out there from many manufacturers but I like the selections from Darton, Parker, Cajun, and PSE. In my opinion, they offer the best “bang for your buck.” Keep the poundage and the let-off in mind when making your selection.

The arrow rest is the easiest choice on this list. You can get a brush rest, like the whisker biscuit, or you can get a twister arrow rest. The only thing that you need to be aware of, is that the arrows for bowfishing are on the heavier end, so durability is key. Plastic is okay, but aluminum or steel is preferred given the weight of the arrows.

Bowfishing points should stay locked in place. One of the biggest issues that I used to have when I would head out to the water is that my points would come loose fairly easily. When purchasing, always ask questions to make certain that the points that you choose will stand up to the abuse that you will be putting them through. I have found that tempered stainless steel is a good option. Double check the size of your shafts so that you know the point will work. You also want to check the barbs; Once you shoot the fish, you don’t want it to get away because of flimsy hooks.

When you get your arrows, you want to make sure that you get something that is going to have high visibility. These are different from archery bow arrows. That is one reason why these arrows are white. These arrows are going to be longer than most–the arrows that I use are 33-34”. This is why you need to take into account the arrow rest that you have chosen. Whatever arrow you get, I suggest that you do not cut them down. The heavier the arrow is, the better. This will allow it to get through the water much more effectively.

Getting your bow setup can seem like a daunting task, but I assure you that it is not. If you know what you should be looking for, then it will be a breeze. As I mentioned earlier, you can transform most of your old [or current] bows into bowfishing bows in no time. If you are looking to take on this sport, then I would suggest that you get a dedicated setup. The reason for this is that you are going to have to continually change and tune the archery accessories that are on your bow before each outing. This could end up being a hassle.

How to Measure and Release Fish Correctly

Many people approach measuring fish with a relaxed approach and risk hefty fines, particularly if the fish is borderline size. There is no grey area when it comes to legal size of catch. Even the difference of 1cm can have you in trouble, and is just not worth the risk of a fine.

Sustainability needs to be taken very seriously, hence Fisheries have very clear guidelines. Sustainable fishing means that fish are harvested at a sustainable rate, so the fish population does not decline over time due to poor fishing practices. Imagine a world that is over-harvested and the corresponding devastation to the eco-system and to our future generations. It is the responsibility of each and every one of us to do our bit to protect the planet.

Size limits are typically based on biological research into the reproductive cycle of each species. Minimum size limits generally allow fish to spawn at least once and contribute to the population before they are taken.

The biggest mistake when measuring the length of your catch is where people don’t use a flat surface to measure the fish on. Ensure that if you use a mat, that it is not crumpled causing you to potentially overestimate the size of the fish. Adhesive or stick-on devices, when exposed to the weather, can shrink and become unreliable. Using a solid measuring implement is the best way.

As fish tend to contract if placed on ice, err on the side of caution and allow an extra inch at the initial measure.

Close the jaw of the fish to ensure an accurate reading. The overall measurement of a fish, whether it is fork tailed or round tailed, is taken from the outside of the snout on the upper jaw, to the extreme tip of the tail.

Your State Fisheries website will likely have an outline on how to measure an array of sea life e.g. crabs and squid as well as fish, so it might be worthwhile printing out a copy and keeping it in your tackle box for reference.

To assist in survival of your catch, avoid holding the belly area as you will almost certainly damage internal organs, which reduces chances of survival dramatically.

Never touch the fish’s gills as they are easily damaged.

Use a pair of long-nosed pliers, or a purpose made hook-release to quickly and efficiently remove the hook. If the fish has hooked deeply, cut the line as close to the hook as possible and leave the hook in the fish as it will probably do more damage trying to remove a deep hook than to leave it where it is.

Top 5 Panama Saltwater Game Fish Sought After by Experienced Anglers

Blue Marlin

For nearly a century, blue marlin have served as an emblem that represents the skill and finesse of an angler. Due to their size, strength and speed, successfully catching a blue marlin is an amazing feat that does not go unnoticed in the fishing community. We release all Blue Marlin, but in many other countries they are fished for their culinary value, as their meat is used to prepare sashimi.

Sailfish

Sailfish are notorious for being one of the fastest fish, making them extremely difficult to catch. These fish can swim up to 68 mph, allowing them to jump incredibly high. This makes reeling one in a challenge, and the angler must be wary of the fish’s actions so it does not escape from the line. Of all the Panama saltwater gamefish, sailfish can be infuriating to deal with and may discourage less-experienced anglers.

Yellowfin Tuna

Like sailfish, yellowfin tuna area also notoriously difficult to catch; in addition to swimming at a high rate of speed, yellowfin are among the strongest fish. Hooking one is like hooking a torpedo with how explosive and powerful they are. Yellowfin are also sought after by commercial fisherman due to their culinary value, frequently being used to create delicious meals packed with protein.

Roosterfish

Panama saltwater fishing is a great way to encounter roosterfish. Their name originated from the seven long, curved spines on the top of its head, which resemble a rooster’s comb. Interestingly, roosterfish have zero use in cooking or eating and are fished solely for sport. As a result, these fish are rarely ever kept, commonly being released back into the wild after the angler has reeled them in. Their incredible size makes catching one a huge accomplishment, as they can grow to be over 110 pounds.

Dorado

Dorado is the fish that is marketed as the popular “mahi-mahi.” Mahi-mahi means “very strong” in Hawaiian, which is a testament to how difficult this fish can be to catch. They put up a significant fight when hooked, often jumping out of the water to extreme heights. Dorado are revered for their taste, and their savory meat is brimming with flavor. As a result, mahi-mahi is extremely popular commercially and frequently served at high-class establishments.

Panama saltwater fishing is a unique and challenging experience, and each of the top five Panama saltwater gamefish are sure to give anglers a run for their money. Fishing enthusiasts from across the world come to Panama to take advantage of its extraordinary opportunities. With such a great locations for fishing readily available, it should be capitalized upon in order to reap the benefits of its fantastic sport fishing.

Want To Catch Big Bass? You Have To Fish For Them!

Yes, we all want to catch big bass and catch that once in a lifetime bass but most anglers just don’t fish for them. They fish where the average size bass are located but not the monster bass. Then the angler wonders why he doesn’t catch the fish he wants to catch.

A big bass isn’t going to be out in the open. for sure. Matter of fact, most anglers will never ever get near a monster when fishing. They are too worried about catching bass and just fish where the average size bass feeds and lives. Yes, they fish structure, weeds, stumps and etc. but that is not where the pigs are feeding. The anglers have read so much about bass fishing they think that is where to fish for big bass.
It’s NOT!

Confused? You’re not alone, so are hundreds of thousands other bass anglers. Do you really think the lunkers got big by being out in the open where other small bass are feeding? Yeah, you’ll catch a nice bass every so often but you’re not catching big bass on a regular basis. Big bass are going to be in deep cover, some bass have never seen a lure even because anglers don’t go where they are located.

Big bass are going to be located in the thickest, heaviest cover you can find or even imagine. They are going to stay close to that cover most of their lives. Some will never see a lure because anglers won’t go where they are or don’t know where they are in the lake they are fishing. You can fish a whole lake and never come close to a monster bass.

I know an angler and have fished with him that catches nice size bass regularly. Other anglers just can’t believe how he catches monster bass all the time. So, why does he catch the pigs while other anglers are catching nothing? Because he fishes for them! He fishes where they are, he goes in places where most anglers don’t even think of going and fishing. He fishes lures that resemble the prey the bass are eating. He imitates the prey with his retrieve and does everything he can to make that lure look real.

If the bass are eating craws, why throw a lure that is 10 inches long? How does that imitate what the bass are eating? If the bass are feeding on shad then why throw a craw? Listen, bass have lived where they are most of their lives, they know what is natural in their environment. If something is out of place then the bass is going to know that and be cautious about being around it. Bass didn’t get their size because they just fed on anything that came along. If their environment changes then they are not going to feed… period.

Another thing is big bass aren’t going to chase your lure like you think they will go after it. The guy who catches the big bass on a regular basis fishes his lure so slow that you think he fell asleep. It might take him 10 minutes to get his lure back to the boat. He wants to keep his lure in front of the big bass’ face for as long as he can keep it there. Why does he do that? To temp the bass into striking longer.

I fish the same way, I fish the heaviest, thickest cover I can find. I put my lure right where the cover is the thickest and then wait. After awhile I will move the lure and move it slow. I learned this a long time ago and noticed when I fish like this I catch more nice bass and you will too. I fish from shore a lot and have had dozen of boating anglers come over and ask what I was using as a lure. I would tell them and even show them my lure. What they didn’t realize was it didn’t matter if I showed them the lure or not if they didn’t have the technique to go along with it. Next time you’re out on your favorite lake, look around, look under trees, look for the thickest cover in the lake and try fishing it. Fish where others don’t fish or even think about going to find cover. Try it! You’ll be surprised!